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Armour Artifacts are used to boost troops in World War. The Artifacts are crafted, displayed and empowered at the Museum.


Historical Descriptions Edit

Pickelhaube Edit

Pickelhaube

Felt Pickelhaube Edit

The Pickelhaube is a military spiked hat o helmet that, while used by many armies throughout the world, is mostly associated with the Prussian and German militaries. Though there are many designs, the most common one was made from hardened leather with a large metal spike on top. During World War I, when leather stockpiles ran low and materials became more expensive to procure, Germany started making lower quality versions out of felt and paper. Today's Pickelhauben are worn as part of ceremonial dress uniforms by many militaries.

Kaiser Wilhelm II's Pickelhaube Edit

Wilhelm II reigned for 30 years as the Kaiser of Germany and was the last to hold that title. He was well known for his impatience and for his aggressive expansion of the German Empire. Wilhelm II's reign was rife with controversy due to his tendency to make impulsive statements without consulting his associates. After facing numerous scandals and calls for his abdication, the final blow to his reign was Germany's defeat int World War I. Wilhelm II was forced to give up the throne and flee to the Netherlands where he lived the rest of his life in exile.

The Pickelhaube is a military spiked hat o helmet that, while used by many armies throughout the world, is mostly associated with the Prussian and German militaries. Though there are many designs, the most common one was made from hardened leather with a large metal spike on top. During World War I, when leather stockpiles ran low and materials became more expensive to procure, Germany started making lower quality versions out of felt and paper. Today's Pickelhauben are worn as part of ceremonial dress uniforms by many militaries.

Brodie helmet Edit

Brodie Helmet

Brodie helmet Edit

The Brodie helmet was the original design for the Mark I British Helmet and the M1917 U.S. Helmet. Compared to many early styles of helmets during World War, the Brodie helmet had proven to give adequate protection against modern shrapnel and gunfire. It was also crafted from a single sheet of steel, which meant that it was not only strong and solid but also cheap to manufacture.

John Leopold Brodie's Helmet Edit

Early World War I statistics showed that an unusually high number of soldiers suffered from some kind of head injury. The British evaluated the new French-designed steel helmet but found them to not provide enough protection when compared to their production cost. John Leopold Brodie was an inventor who took it upon himself to create, and patent, the 'Brodie helmet.' This new design was particularly strong and was lined with a padding for shock absorption that proved especially useful against overhead shrapnel.

The Brodie helmet was the original design for the Mark I British Helmet and the M1917 U.S. Helmet. Compared to many early styles of helmets during World War, the Brodie helmet had proven to give adequate protection against modern shrapnel and gunfire. It was also crafted from a single sheet of steel, which meant that it was not only strong and solid but also cheap to manufacture.

Body Shield Edit

Body Shield

Brewster Body Shield Edit

The Brewster Body Shield was an experimental suit of body armor aimed to protect the user from shrapnel and gunfire. The U.S. military tested the body shield by having several soldiers fire full clips of machine gun ammo at the suit while its inventor was still inside. Although the suit performed remarkably well, due to its bulky size and heavy weight it was deemed too difficult for soldiers to use effectively on the battlefield. The Army instead shifted its focus to creating steel helmets to protect their soldiers from head injuries.

Casimir Zeglen's Brewster Body Shield Edit

Casimir Zeglen was a Polish Christian monk and inventor who created the first bulletproof vest. Upon hearing about the multiple attempted (and eventually successful) assassination attempts on the then Chicago Mayor, Zeglen searched for a new way to help save lives. His goal was to create a lightweight bullet-resistant vest. He discovered that a very particular way of hand sewing silk proved to be successful at stopping close range pistol fire, but the cost and skill required to mass produce thes vests were too high for Zeglen alone. Eventually, Zeglen met and collaborated with renowned inventor and entrepreneur Jan Szczepanik. Together they created the first commercially available bulletproof vest and body armor.

The Brewster Body Shield was an experimental suit of body armor aimed to protect the user from shrapnel and gunfire. The U.S. military tested the body shield by having several soldiers fire full clips of machine gun ammo at the suit while its inventor was still inside. Although the suit performed remarkably well, due to its bulky size and heavy weight it was deemed too difficult for soldiers to use effectively on the battlefield. The Army instead shifted its focus to creating steel helmets to protect their soldiers from head injuries.

Kepi Edit

French Kepi

French Kepi Edit

The Kepi was the standard headgear for early 19th century French military. These light and comfortable cloth caps were issued in addition to the older bulky Shako military caps in the 1850s. During the Franco-Prussian war, many soldiers refused to wear their heavy Shako caps and instead wore a Kepi into battle. Therefore, in 1870, the French government replaced the Shako and made Kepi caps the official headgear for active service members. However, during World War I. the French needed helmets that protected against modern gunfire and shrapnel, and the Kepi was replaced with steel combat helmets for use in the battlefield.

The French Foreign Legion's Kepi Edit

The French Foreign Legion is a branch of the French army that allows recruits from foreign countries to enlist in the French Armed Forces. During World War I, the Foreign Legion played a critical role in the fight against Germany by enlisting many refugees from now German-occupied lands to fight back. The French Foreign Legion was established in 1831 and is still active to this day.

The Kepi was the standard headgear for early 19th century French military. These light and comfortable cloth caps were issued in addition to the older bulky Shako military caps in the 1850s. During the Franco-Prussian war, many soldiers refused to wear their heavy Shako caps and instead wore a Kepi into battle. Therefore, in 1870, the French government replaced the Shako and made Kepi caps the official headgear for active service members. However, during World War I. the French needed helmets that protected against modern gunfire and shrapnel, and the Kepi was replaced with steel combat helmets for use in the battlefield.